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Artforum loves ALL CAPS

I love you, Artforum. But I do have a little bit of a funny thing. It’s hilarious how this Artforum headline appears in all caps in Google News.

Artforum-all-caps-on-google-news

All the other publishers use a standard title case or AP/Chicago/MLA style. But Artforum, the long-time traditional art magazine, has this headline appear as all caps.

You know that I love the all caps. I love them for emphasis in chat. They can make text more LIVELY. But when you are scrolling through Google News, you kinda want the experience to be consistent.

Certainly this just has to do with how Google News processes the headlines from Artforum. But it’s also partly Artforum’s styling. They literally have the headline in all caps on their site:

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL ON PABLO PICASSO, FAITH RINGGOLD, HENRI MATISSE, AND ALMA THOMAS AT MOMA

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL ON PABLO PICASSO, FAITH RINGGOLD, HENRI MATISSE, AND ALMA THOMAS AT MOMA

Most sites will store the headline like this:
Kerry James Marshall on Pablo Picasso, Faith Ringgold, Henri Matisse, and Alma Thomas at MoMA

And then if the website styles the text to uppercase, it uses a CSS style to make the text look like it’s all caps, but really it’s just regular title casing.

Doing a search on Google News for Artforum shows only a few articles with these all caps. Thus, certainly this was just a formatting mistake. But I like to imagine that Artforum really wanted to emphasize a couple articles for their importance.

By the way, the article is worth a read. Kerry James Marshall talks about how benches function in museums:

In the new new MoMA, the bench seems to be more than just a perch on which to take a load off. In at least two cases that got my attention, the benches mark the presence of Black artists in unexpected places, as if to suggest, You might need to sit down for a minute to get a handle on this.

I only wish that museums would put benches near artworks that have heavy impact.

Marshall continues on about benches:

I recently saw a photograph from sixteen years ago, the last time MoMA was new. Picasso’s “iconic” Les demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907, hung in the center of its gallery wall, flanked by smaller works of his from the same period, but without a bench.

Read the article for even more insight into museum benches from Kerry James Marshall.

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